Larne and Islandmagee Roots

For anybody that is willing to share historical information on the Islandmagee area obtained from offical sources as books, PRONI or newspapers, or local knowledge. If need be I will start separate area forums

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admi
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Larne and Islandmagee Roots

Post by admi »

Larne Roots

It reminded me that my maternal grandmother whose maiden name was Jane Ogilby came from Kilwaughter.
My grandfather, William Hopkins came from a place called "The Hollow" in Islandmagee.
Larne was the closest market town to both these townlands so of course they knew a lot about it.
When they married in the 1890's they lived in Larne for a time and my mother and one of her brothers were born there.
Eventually they moved to Belfast, for employment reasons I think, but they never became city folk or lost there lovely accents. Indeed my grandmother used what I now think of as being Ulster Scots phrases all her life.
I grew up hearing stories of old Larne and the surrounding area. I heard how the folk who lived at the Larne end of the Island would take their produce to market on McKinstry's ferry boat. That is if it could be carried, if not they would set off after midnight for Whitehead driving a horse and cart and make the long Journey to Larne by road.
I often heard the story of how James Chaine was buried in the hills above Larne in an upright position looking out to sea. I am sure I remember it being said that this was at his own expressed wish.

Both my grandparents came from the typically large families of those times so there is a possibility that I may have some, what would now be, distant relatives living in the area.
If anyone recognises the names of my grandparents as being relative to their own forebears please feel free to contact me through this URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/place-nireland ... ead=290341



borrowed from http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/place-nireland
admi
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The Gobbins

Post by admi »

Subject: The Gobbins
Posted Jun 27, 2003 by Big Henry

In your article you say that your grandfather came from Islandmagee. Do you know anything about the Gobbins - even where the name came from? Am I right to think that there is a Dolmen on the island? Finally - I don't suppose you know where the name Portmuck came from?

Subject: The Gobbins
Posted Jun 28, 2003 by Brian Willis

Hi Big Henry,
Oh yes thereÔÇÖs a dolmen on Islandmagee all right. (For those who donÔÇÖt know about our historic landscape, a dolmen is a megalithic portal grave of three upright stones, two tall ones and the other slightly shorter. On top of these is a capstone forming a sloping table. IÔÇÖd do you a wee drawing but canÔÇÖt put graphics on these contribution pages ÔÇô pity)

The one at Islandmagee is known as the Ballylumford Dolmen, it is in the front garden of a house very near their front door.

ThereÔÇÖs an apocryphal story of a local councillor, when discussing the dolmenÔÇÖs proximity to the building, commenting that he couldnÔÇÖt understand why they built it so near the house in the first place.
Regards
Brian

Subject: The Gobbins
Posted Jun 29, 2003 by The History Man

The only thing I know about the Gobbins is that at one time there was a tubular bridge and a suspension bridge across wide breaks in the cliffs. This allowed members of the public to walk along the sea edge of the cliffs.
When these bridges fell into disrepair they were not reinstated.
I have two very old post cards showing pictures of both bridges and judging by the dress of the ladies it would be the late 1800 or early 1900's when they were published.
As for Portmuck I am sure I heard my mother call it the "port of the pigs" but I have no idea why nor do I know What Portmuck means.

Subject: The Gobbins
Posted Jun 29, 2003 by Lone Walker

I think you are right about the pigs and Port Muck. Slieve Muck in the Mournes was once known as Pig Mountain. This is too much of a coincidence..

Subject: The Gobbins
Posted Jul 4, 2003 by Brian Willis

Yes, according to one of my bumper books of Irish placenames, "Muc" is the source name for pig. From which you also get names with Muck and Mucky in them. However, if that's the case, how come Muckamore means Plain of the confluence?

borrowed from this URL:-
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/place-nireland ... ead=290341
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