PROVINCE OF ULSTER from Slater's Directory 1846

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PROVINCE OF ULSTER from Slater's Directory 1846

Post by irishgen » 15 Jul 2004, 21:20

(extracted from Slater Directory 1846)
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PROVINCE OF ULSTER.

THIS is the most northern province of Ireland; it is bounded on the north and west by the Atlantic Ocean, on the east by the North Channel of the Irish Sea, and on the south-east and south-west by the provinces of Leinster and Connaught. Its greatest extent, from Malin Bay on the west to Dunaghadee on the east, is nearly one hundred and thirty miles, and from Glenegad Head, on the north, to the most southern point of the county of Cavan, is about one hundred and ten miles. The circumference of the province, taking in all its sinuosities and indentations, is full seven hundred and eighty miles, enclosing an area of 5,459,314 statute acres, of which there are arable about 3,400,000 acres ; uncultivated, 1,800,000; plantations, 80,000; sites of towns, 8,800; and water, 215,000. The province comprises the counties of Antrim, Armagh, Cavan, Donegal, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry, Monaghan, and Tyrone. These are divided into sixty-six baronies, and subdivided into three hundred and ninety-one parishes. The population of the province will appear in the summary at the end of this article. Ulster has the advantage of both canal and river navigation the former are the Ulster Canal and the Newry Canal the first named commences from Charlemont (where it communicates with Lough Neagh by the Blackwater river), and enters Lough Erne at its eastern extremity. The Newry proceeds from the town of its name to Portadown, where it joins the Bann river and the Tyrone navigation. The Lagan, the Foyle, the Blackwater, and the Bann, are all navigable rivers wholly or in part.



(extracted from Slater Directory 1846)
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