ISSN 1443-5888 Volume 7, No. 11, November 2005.

A Monthly Newsletter: Editor: Terry Eakin, 334 Burns Bay Road, LANE COVE, NSW 2066 Contact E-mail address: tea04055@bigpond.net.au
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ISSN 1443-5888 Volume 7, No. 11, November 2005.

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ÔÇÿALL IRELAND SOURCESÔÇÖ NEWSLETTER
A Monthly Newsletter: Editor: Terry Eakin, 334 Burns Bay Road, LANE COVE, NSW 2066 Contact E-mail address: tea04055@bigpond.net.au
ISSN 1443-5888 Volume 7, No. 11, November 2005.

Introduction: ÔÇÿAll Ireland SourcesÔÇÖ is a monthly newsletter distributed free by E-mail to Family History Societies and interested researchers near the end of each month. Distribution by Australia Post each three months (three issues) costs $6.00 annually within Australia. The aim is to bring items of interest regarding Irish record sources to the Australian genealogist. The editor would appreciate being made aware of records relating to the Irish, particularly those held in Australia or new in the LDS Family History Library. Back copies available free for downloading from www.sag.org.au. Note new email address.
Ulster Historical Foundation: A Conference Celebrating the First 50 Years: The Ulster Historical Foundation is celebrating its first 50 years in 2006 with a conference in Belfast from Monday 25 September through until Saturday 30 September 2006. Full details will be available early in 2006 and should be in the January newsletter.
Directories and Gazetteers: For those areas and classes which they cover, Irish directories are an excellent source, often supplying information not readily available elsewhere. Their most obvious and practical use is to find out where precisely, in the larger towns, a family lived, but for members of the gentry, and the professional, merchant and trading classes, they can show much more, providing indirect evidence of reversals of fortune or growing prosperity, of death and emigration. In many cases, directory entries are the only precise indication of occupation. The only classes totally excluded from all directories are, once again, the most disadvantaged, small tenant farmers, landless labourers (cottiers) and servants.
Virtually all classes other than these are at least partially included, in some on the nineteenth century directories in particular. One point to be kept in mind when using any directory is that every entry is at least six months out of date by the time of publication. Until the productions of Pigot and Co. in the early nineteenth century, very little exists which covers the entire country of Ireland. Although not true directories in the sense of the Dublin publications, four works may be used in a similar way, at least as far as the country gentry are concerned.
The earliest of these is George Taylor and Andrew SkinnerÔÇÖs Road Maps of Ireland (1778) which prints maps of the principal routes from Dublin to the country towns, including the major country houses and the surnames of their occupants, with an alphabetical index to these surnames.
The aim of William WilsonÔÇÖs The Post-Chaise Companion (1786) is similar, providing a description of what might be seen on various journeys through the countryside. These descriptions include the names of the country houses and, again, their ownersÔÇÖ surnames. There is no index in this book.
The next publications were the two editions, in 1812 and 1814, of Ambrose LeetÔÇÖs Directory. This contains an alphabetical listing of placenames ÔÇô towns, villages, country houses, townlands, in an arbitrary mix ÔÇô showing the county, the nearest post town, and, in the case of the houses, the full name of the occupant. These names are then themselves indexed at the back of the volume.
Early countrywide directories were
1778 George Taylor & Andrew Skinner: Road Maps of Ireland (Reprint I.U.P. 1969) NLI Ir 9141 t 1
1786 William Wilson: The Post-Chaise Companion NLI Ir J 9141 w 13
1812 Ambrose Leet: A List of [..] Noted Places NLI Ir 9141 I 10
1814 Ambrose Leet: A Directory to the Market Towns, Villages, GentlemenÔÇÖs Seats and other noted places in Ireland NLI Ir 9141 l 10
1820 J. Pigot: Commercial Directory of Ireland. NLI Ir 9141 c 25
1824 J. Pigot: City of Dublin and Hibernian Provincial Directory NLI Ir 9141 p 75
1846 SlaterÔÇÖs: National Commercial Directory of Ireland. NLI Ir 9141 s 30
1856 SlaterÔÇÖs: Royal National Commercial Directory of Ireland NLI Ir 9141 s 30
1870 SlaterÔÇÖs: Royal National Commercial Directory of Ireland NLI Ir 9141 s 30
1881 SlaterÔÇÖs: Royal National Commercial Directory of Ireland NLI Ir 9141 s 30
1894 SlaterÔÇÖs: Royal National Commercial Directory of Ireland NLI Ir 9141 s 30

See also Dublin Directories from 1834 & Belfast Directories
1740 Belfast Directory 1740 Pub. North Irish Roots Vol 4, No. 2 (1993)
1807-1808 Belfast Directory 1807-08 J.R.R.Adams (1992) UHF
1819 T. Bradshaw: General Directory of Newry and Armagh
1820 T. Bradshaw: General Directory of Portadown, Waringstown, Banbridge, Warrenspoint, Rostrevor, Kilkeel, Rathfriland and others
1841 M. Martin: Belfast Directory
1852 James Alexander Henderson: The Belfast and Province of Ulster Directory for 1856 1st Edition
1854 James Alexander Henderson: The Belfast and Province of Ulster Directory for 1856 2nd Edition
1856 James Alexander Henderson: The Belfast and Province of Ulster Directory for 1856 3rd Edition
1865 WynneÔÇÖs Directory (includes many towns)
1872 Belfast Directory
1881 S. Farrell: County Armagh Directory and Almanac
1883 George H. Bassett: County Down: One Hundred Years Ago
1886 George H. Bassett: County Down: One Hundred Years Ago
1916 Newtownards and County Down Illustrated Almanac
1918 Newtownards and County Down Illustrated Almanac
1877 Thom: Ireland ÔÇô ThomÔÇÖs Irish Almanac & Official Directory 1877 (34th annual publication) and annually until the 1960s or later.

1818 The Treble Almanack for the Year 1818 containing John Watson StewartÔÇÖs Almanack; The English Court Registry; and WilsonÔÇÖs Dublin Directory with a New correct Plan of the City. Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books UK and available from Eneclann Dublin and GouldÔÇÖs South Australia $42.50
1836 Ireland ÔÇô The Dublin Almanac & General Register of Ireland 1836 As above
1877 Thom: Ireland ÔÇô ThomÔÇÖs Irish Almanac & Official Directory 1877 (34th annual publication) As above but $50 from GouldÔÇÖs South Australia.
1836 A Complete Catholic Registry, Directory, and Almanack Vol. 1 ISBN 1-846300-15-0 Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼19.90
1845 The Dublin Almanac, and General Register of Ireland for the Year 1845, being the 8th year of the reign of her present majesty, Victoria. ISBN 1-846300-01-0 Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼26.90
1856 The Belfast and Province of Ulster Directory (3rd ed., 1856) by James Alexander Henderson ISBN 1-846300-08-8 Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼29.90
1824 PigotÔÇÖs Commercial Directory of Ireland, 1824, Ulster section (ISBN 1-846300-31-2) or the complete directory available (ISBN 1┬¡846300-27-4) Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼16.45 or Ôé¼49.51 for the complete compendium
1835-36 William Matier: MatierÔÇÖs Belfast Directory for 1835-36 Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼16.45
1837 Samuel Lewis: Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 3 vols (1st Edition, 1837) ISBN 1-846300-00-2 complete with coloured maps Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼41.24
1846 SlaterÔÇÖs Commercial Directory of Ireland; Ulster & Belfast Sections. ISBN 1-846300-06-1 or the complete directory ISBN 1-846300-07┬¡X Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼16.45 or Ôé¼49.51 for the complete compendium
1881 SlaterÔÇÖs Commercial Directory of Ireland, 1881 Ulster & Belfast Sections. ISBN 1-846300-38-X Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼16.45

1852 Medical Directory of Ireland, 1852. ISBN 1-846300-40-1 Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼24.71
1919 KennyÔÇÖs Irish Manufacturers Directory, 1919. ISBN 1-846300-43-6 Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼16.45
1845 Pettigrew & Oulton, Dublin Almanac & General Register of Ireland, 1845. ISBN 1-846300-01-0 Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books Ireland: Ôé¼22.23
1924 Alumni Dublinenses 1924 [covers 1637-1846] Published on CD ROM by Archive CD Books: Ôé¼21.41
1738 A Directory of Dublin for the Year 1738, ISBN 0 946841 59 4 H/c book published 2000 by Dublin City Corp. Library with A3 size map.

As you can see, many of these directories, especially the rarer ones, have been scanned and published on CD ROM and are available at present for purchase and are easily used at home.
GALONG CASTLE: A Heritage Icon: Galong was the home of a convict emancipist, Edward (Ned) Ryan. Ned was in the area in the 1820s. He carved out a large tract of land to turn it into a replica of his home county (Tipperary), Clonoulty in Ireland. Galong was between Binnalong and Boorowa in New South Wales. Galong was home to two Aboriginal tribes, the Wiradjuri and Ngunnawal. The coming of European settlement was to see these tribes gradually disappear. The Friends of St ClementÔÇÖs hope to make a fitting memorial to their presence and to work towards national recognition.
A major task of the Friends of St ClementÔÇÖs will be to restore the Ryan Castle to its former glory, and in accordance with the famed hospitality of the Ryan family, to make St ClementÔÇÖs a place of welcome to travellers. The restoration will include the creation of a museum to record the contribution of the Ryan family to the early colonial history of the district. It will be a fitting tribute to Edward (Ned) Ryan who acquired the title: Patriarch of the Lachlan, King of Galong Castle.
The Canberra Museum and Gallery currently has an exhibition running from 3 December 2005 to 26 March 2006 titled ÔÇ£Galong ÔÇô Paradise of the RyansÔÇØ. The exhibition is on at the Gallery, Cnr London Circuit and Civic Square, Canberra City ACT 2608 on Tuesday ÔÇô Friday 10.00 am to 5.00 pm and Saturday and Sunday Noon to 5.00 pm. Enquiries re this exhibition: telephone 02 6207 1968.
This exhibition tells the story of one Irish family and its powerful influence on the pastoral lands to the north of Canberra. Edward ÔÇÿNedÔÇÖ Ryan, of Clonoulty, County Tipperary, arrived in New South Wales as a convict in 1816 and had established himself as a squatter by the late 1820s. By the early 1860s, so evident was the Irish presence in the Boorowa ÔÇô Galong ÔÇô Binalong district, that one observer called it the ÔÇÿParadise of the RyansÔÇÖ. The RyansÔÇÖ legacy can be seen today in the Catholic churches in the area, in the survival of ÔÇÿGalong CastleÔÇÖ, and in the existence of the great Redemptorist Monastery at Galong. So do go along and see the exhibition and visit Galong Castle, Monastery and Retreat Centre and its historic cemetery. For further reading go to Irish Roots Magazine, Issue No. 56, 2005 Fourth Quarter pages 6 & 7, Australian Notebook: Galong ÔÇô Shamrock in the Bush by Dr Jennifer Harrison. The following books are in print and available from St ClementÔÇÖs, Galong NSW 2585
ÔÇó
King of Galong Castle: The Story of Ned Ryan 1786-1871 by Max Barrett C.SS.R. ISBN 0-959618-84-8

ÔÇó
A Riot of Ryans: The 19th Century Ryans of Boorowa by Max Barrett C.SS.R. ISBN 0-949122-35-1;

ÔÇó
Because of These: Irish Background, Australian Surround of Thirteen Tipperary Transportees by Max Barrett C.SS.R. ISBN 0-646095-59-5; and

ÔÇó
Galong Cemetery by Max Barrett C.SS.R.


ROTUNDA HOSPITAL, DUBLIN: The Rotunda Hospital, officially or also known as the Dublin Lying-in Hospital was the first maternity hospital in Britain or Ireland and was at one time the largest in the world. Really it is two separate complexes, the hospital proper and the Rotunda or social rooms from which the hospital derives its name. Originally the hospital was started in 1745 in South Great Georges Street but was moved to here in 1748 by its founder, Bartholemew Mosse (1712-1759). At this time the site at the top of Gardiners Mall was bordering on the open countryside. The design by Richard Cassels who was a friend of Mosse is based on his design for Leinster House. The design of the building and its environs were intended to aid fundraising (the hospital was totally dependent on charity), the social rooms were intended to provide entertainment, there were pleasure gardens around the hospital, and the exterior façade was designed to attract attention from the fashionable quarters of Dublin society.
Visually the exterior of the Hospital is a country house composition with its wings and curving links. The central block is distinguished by the large window in the centre that lights the chapel inside and the campanile with its decorative baroque copper dome. The campanile is placed centrally in elevation but is sited to the rear of the block.
The Rotunda itself contained entertainment rooms and was extended many times from its original design by James Ensor including additions by Richard Johnston and James Gandon. While the exterior is relatively undistinguished for a building closing such an important vista ÔÇô it closes the top of OÔÇÖConnell Street, the interior of the rotunda was considered to be one of the finest circular rooms in Britain. James Gandon was responsible for the sculpted stone frieze around the exterior of the round room as well as the entrance block to the theatre.
The Rotunda itself contained entertainment rooms and was extended many times from its original design by James Ensor including additions by Richard Johnston and James Gandon. While the exterior is relatively undistinguished for a building closing such an important vista - it closes the top of O'Connell Street, the interior of the rotunda was considered to be one of the finest circular rooms in Britain. James Gandon was responsible for the sculpted stone frieze around the exterior of the round room as well as the entrance block to the theatre. The Rotunda itself contained entertainment rooms. The Round Room is now the Ambassador Theatre, the Supper Rooms are the Gate Theatre, and the Pillar Room underneath the Theatre is occasionally used for concerts. The curving wings that link the smaller blocks to the main body of the hospital create some interesting public spaces ÔÇô the bar of the Gate Theatre for example.
The most important feature of the hospital interior is the sumptuous chapel ÔÇô again this was a form of fundraising as Charity sermons were a popular form of entertainment for the social classes and so the chapel was placed at the centre of the design, above the main entrance at the first floor level.
Now for the important information. Records of Births survive for this Hospital from 1797-1882 (1797-1863 is pre civil registration) and are filmed and available world wide through the LDS Family History Centres.
Rotunda Hospital, Dublin: Register of Labour Patients, MasterÔÇÖs Ward Book, Records of Births, Admissions and Discharges, 1797-1882. These records are on 25 reels of 35 mm film.
1797-1808 900654
1808-1811, 1819-1822 900655
1822-1831 900656
1859-1874 900657
1800-1811, 1814 900658
1824, 1833-1837 900659
1839-1843 900660
1842, 1844-1846 900661
1847-1851 900662
1852-1854 900663
1855-1856 900664
1857-1858 900665
1838, 1859-1860 900666

1861-1863 900667
1864-1865 900668
1866-1867 900669
1868-1870 900670
1871-1873 900671
1874-1875 900672
1876-1879 900673
Register of Labour Patients 906717
1879-1881, 1831-1836 909895
1836-1841, 1841-1846 909896
1847-1852, 1852-1859 909897
1846-1849, 1873-1880 909898
1876-1882 909899

Articles, suggestions and information for this newsletter are welcome and may be E-mailed to: tea04055@bigpond.net.au or posted to Terry Eakin, 334 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove NSW AUSTRALIA 2066

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