ISSN 1443-5888 Volume 8, No. 1, January 2006.

A Monthly Newsletter: Editor: Terry Eakin, 334 Burns Bay Road, LANE COVE, NSW 2066 Contact E-mail address: tea04055@bigpond.net.au
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ISSN 1443-5888 Volume 8, No. 1, January 2006.

Post by irishgen » 24 Jan 2007, 04:32

ÔÇÿALL IRELAND SOURCESÔÇÖ NEWSLETTER
A Monthly Newsletter: Editor: Terry Eakin, 334 Burns Bay Road, LANE COVE, NSW 2066 Contact E-mail address: tea04055@bigpond.net.au
ISSN 1443-5888 Volume 8, No. 1, January 2006.

Introduction: ÔÇÿAll Ireland SourcesÔÇÖ is a monthly newsletter distributed free by E-mail to Family History Societies and interested researchers near the end of each month. Distribution by Australia Post each three months (three issues) costs $6.00 annually within Australia. The aim is to bring items of interest regarding Irish record sources to the Australian genealogist. The editor would appreciate being made aware of records relating to the Irish, particularly those held in Australia or new in the LDS Family History Library. Back copies available free for downloading from www.sag.org.au Note new email address.
County Tyrone Research: A new site has been launched by the Bready and District Ulster-Scots Development Association with help from the Ulster Historical Foundation. The website can be found at www.breadyancestry.com and it includes information on the heritage of the Bready area (north west County Tyrone). There are searchable genealogical databases containing around 30,000 local area records with more being added by the Association as the records are indexed.
There is a good location map on the website under location and the site is a triangle from Ballymagorry and Dunnamanagh to above Magheramason on the road to Derry City. The main pages are Home, History, Genealogy, Latest News, Location, About Us, Contact Us. Bready is an area of emigration to Australia, North America and the UK as well as elsewhere. The site and database searches are free and you can register and list your ancestors using the contact page. So if you have Tyrone ancestors the site is well worth a visit.
Sources for the databases include:
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The registers of the Bready Reformed Presbyterian Church, Donagheady Church of Ireland, Donagheady Presbyterian Church, Leckpatrick Presbyterian Church and Magheramason Presbyterian Church.

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Gravestone inscriptions from Grange, Donagheady Old and Leckpatrick Old burial grounds.

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Names of former pupils of the Bready, Glenagoorland and Sandville schools.

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Names extracted from maps, leases, letters and rentals of the Downshire estate from the 18th and 19th centuries.

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1901 census returns in full for the Bready area, and

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19th century valuation records. Records continue to be added and the task is scheduled for completion in early 2007.


IRISH NEWSPAPER ARCHIVE: National Micromedia Ltd. launched its newspaper archive on line in late January 2006. The site has had a few teething problems and may be down for maintenance on some occasions. I know it is 18 months late but I am sure you will find it an archive where you can search, find, copy and print your convict trials (assizes) and greatly improve your Irish research which often hits brick walls. FreemanÔÇÖs Journal has a good run of Births, Deaths and Marriages from all over Ireland as well as places like India, Europe and even Australia. The archive can be found at: www.irishnewspaperarchives.com or www.irishnewspaperarchives.com/browse.aspx
The archive launched with the following newspapers:
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FreemanÔÇÖs Journal 1763-1924;

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The Irish Independent 1900 to 2003;

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The Anglo-Celt 1846 to 2001;

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Sunday Independent 1900-2006;

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The Connaught Telegraph 1975-2003;

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The Tuam Herald 1994-2000 but soon to start at 1882;

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The Leitrim Observer 1900-1958; and

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The Meath Chronicle 1897-2002.


These will soon be followed by many other Irish newspapers including:
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The Nation 1842-1897

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The Drogheda Independent 1885-1891 & 1988 to current year;

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The Kerryman 1904 to current year; and

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later many others as they are OCRÔÇÖed and made ready to uplift to the server. Many local council libraries will be subscribers to this newspaper archive as well as some family history societies.


The latest update from National Micromedia Ltd on 13 February 2006 follows:
Indeed many of our features are still not in place. We have been delayed with the banking facility. Sorry for this inconvenience, an unexpected upset. This is having a knock on affect on the last remaining features that we need to put in place. We have been delayed but this should only be for a number of days not weeks. The payment processing facility should be in place by Wednesday this week. Terms and conditions should also be in place by such time.
National Micromedia Ltd is the parent company of Irish Newspaper Archive Ltd. National Micromedia Ltd is the longest established document management company in Ireland. It has serviced the needs of many of Ireland leading organizations i.e. Independent news & media, SmurfitÔÇÖs Corrugated and Ove Arups consultant engineering.
Over the past three decades National Micromedia Ltd has archived 70% if Irelands newspaper industry. A large and extensive archive has been generated, as can be seen on www.nationalmicromedia.com. It is this archive that will be available through the web page www.irishnewspaperarcives.com. All titles that are available on the Irish Newspaper Archives have been scanned and displayed with the strict permission of the each papers proprietor.
We have thirty titles available for use on the Irish Newspaper Archive site. Currently there are eight ready for viewing. The large majority of titles will be available from their inception to current date. Searchable colour PDF images will be introduced were possible. This is mainly down to each newspaper providing the content. Once the site is fully operational, workflow management will be become our priority. We currently have a team of three working on scanning, image verification & rotation, OCRing and indexing. Once the images have been indexed they are immediately available on the site.
We estimate that it will take an initial month from date of launch to clean up the current content. In relation to the start date of 1900; this is incorrect. That is a default delete date that is generated by the workflow process and will be removed from the site. (Recycle bin).
In regard to the titles Anglo-Celt and Connaught Telegraph, they are both available and should be ready for searching and retrieving.
Workflow management:
National Micromedia Ltd is the service provider for INA. It currently holds the largest privately
owned newspaper archive of Irish newspaper in the world. It is indeed the work horse behind the
INA site. The archive dates back as far as 1763 to current.

Our microfilm reels are held and maintained in thousand-foot rolls. With the use of two 2500 Sunrise digitisers we have set about transforming this analogue media in to a digital archive. Over the past three years we have meticulously scanned 1.5 million images at 300 d.p.i b&w tiff images. Our main aim at the scanning stations is quality not speed. The sunrise technology has allowed us to capture the very finest image quality while maintaining a 30 page a minute capture.
Once available the images are then separated into files of 256. Each extension is in date order and numerically listed. From this point on all the software used is bespoke software developed in house. By creating our own software it has granted National Micromedia Ltd the ability to administrate and organize vast amounts of information, with limited human intervention. It is what I would like to call: ÔÇØCommon sense technologyÔÇØ
The images are then fed through two black border removal stations working 24 hours seven days a week. Each image is automatically deskewed and cut to leave a clean sharp image. When dealing with film generated over three decades this can be a tricky area. There are many elements that can affect image quality, lighting, processing, positive or negative film, camera operator and the original copy of course.
Once the images have been verified, they are then ready for the OCRing process. National Micromedia Ltd runs a total of 15 dedicated OCRing stations nonstop 24 hours a day. We can produce over 250,000 tiff and text files a week. At the beginning of each title we run 5 OCR engines over the first pages to accurately assess the best engine for the job.
Each day the images are passed to our team of index operators. Our workflow administration allows us the option of all work to be done remotely if need be. The titles are then broken down in three fields of data. i.e. title, date and page. The Irish Independent in the later years is broken down into supplement i.e. property, marketing and farming.
At the end of each batch of 256 the operator can publish this information to the web page for index building. The Irish Newspaper Website will then be updated with the additional information.
I hope this answers some of your questions. If you require any additional information or have any further question please do not hesitate to contact me.
Once again thank you for continued interest and support.
Andrew Martin
Book Review: Familia: Ulster Genealogical Review edited by Trevor Parkhill and published by the Ulster Historical Foundation each year is available free to members. It is A5 paperback of 160 pages and is researched and published to a high standard.with a blend of articles with the interests of historians and genealogists both catered for. The article by Anne Casement about the Londonderry family estates in counties Londonderry, Antrim, Down and Donegal is especially informative to readers. The contents include:
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ÔÇ£If they would come to AmericaÔÇØ: Inheritance as a form of chain migration, by Peter Gilmore, pps 1-14.

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The Management of the Londonderry Estates in Ulster during the Great Famine, by Anne Casement, pps 15-68.

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Medicine as Cultural Baggage in the Ulster-Scots Settlements of the Valley of Virginia, by Kenneth W Keller, pps 69-89.

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From the North of Ireland to the North River of the Shenandoah: James and Margaret Ramsey, An Ulster-Scot Farming Family in Augusta County, Virginia, by Lee K Ramsey, pps 90-106.

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From McCorry to Curry: The Evolution of a Surname, by Paul Richmond, pps 107-122.

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FriarÔÇÖs Bush Cemetery ÔÇô History and Horror in Two Acres of Land, by James Bartlett, pps 123-126.


Reviews of books and journals in Familia include:
A Blad O Ulster-Scotch Frae Ullans: Ulster-Scots Culture, Language, and Literature by Michael Montgomery and Anne Smyth published by The Ullans Press, Belfast (2003), ISBN 0 053035 08 5, 229 pps, cost £8.00 English plus postage.
Fermanagh: History and Society by Eileen M. Murphy and William J. Roulston, published by Geography Publications, Dublin (2004), ISBN 0 906602 52 1, 714 pps, cost £42.50 English plus postage.
A History of Ulster: New Updated Edition by Jonathan Bardon, published by The Blackstaff Press, Belfast (2005), ISBN 0 856407 64 X, pps xxvi and 913, cost £15.99 English plus postage.
Carson: The Man Who Divided Ireland by Geoffrey Lewis, published by Hambledon and London, London (2005), ISBN 1 852854 54 5, pps 288, cost £19.99 English plus postage.
Misfit, A Revolutionary Life by Captain Jack White published by Livewire Publications, Dublin (2005) ISBN 1 905225 20 2, pps 259, cost £14.99 English plus postage.
The Burning of Whitegoose Lodge, Ribbonism in Louth ÔÇô Murder and the Gallows by Monsignor Raymond Murray, published by Cumann Seanchais Ard Mhacha, Monaghan (2005), ISBN 0 951149 02 4, pps 359, price not available.
Samuel Chearnley, Miscelanea Structura Curiosa by William Laffan, with introductory essays by Toby Bernard, Christine Casey and William Laffin and an appendix by Peter Harbison, published byy Churchill House Press, Tralee (2005), ISBN 0 955902 460 9 (sic), pps 173 including 83 plates, cost 85.00 Euros plus postage. Note the ISBN has an extra digit in it.
Ringing True: The Bells of Trummery and Beyond, 350 Years of an Irish Quaker Family by Bill Jackson, published by William Sessions Ltd., York (2005), ISBN 1 850723 29 X, pps 241, cost £16.00 English plus postage.
The Sun-Dialled Meeting-Houses, Cullybackey: A Short History of the Cuningham Memorial Presbyterian Church and its Predecessor, by Jane Megaw, published by The Congregational Committee, 21 Dreen Road, Cullybackey BT 42 1EB (2005), pps 173, price £10.00 plus postage.
Directory of Irish Family History Research: The directory is a published listing if its Guild membersÔÇÖ research interests and is published annually. 100 pages A4 size, ISBN 1 903688 59 0Number 28, 2005 and available from the UHF bookshop at www.ancestryireland.com Briefly the contents are:
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List of SubscribersÔÇÖ Research Interests (alphabetical order by surname being researched and cross-referenced to the List of Subscribers by membership number). Pages 5 - 39

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List of Subscribers with Contact Details (numerical order by membership number) pages 41 ÔÇô 74.

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Guild news pages 76 ÔÇô 77.

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Cotton Production in Belfast (which lists Cotton Manufacturers, Cotton Spinners and Cotton Yarn Merchants) page 78.

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Hearts of Steel Memorial, 1771-2 on pages 79 ÔÇô 86 with names and addresses of over 1,000 petitioners.

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Passengers on the Philadelphia, 1771 from a letter published in the Belfast Newsletter on 26 November 1771 on page 86.

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Island Magee Tenants in 1770 on page 87.

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Did your ancestors leave Ireland for England or Scotland and you cannot find them? Its not surprising --- Do you know who was on the 7.11am bus this morning?


This last article is one of the better explanations of why it is difficult to track or trace family movements between Ireland and Scotland or Northern England and vice versa. There has always been, as there is today, a complete freedom of movement between Ireland and Great Britain and therefore there are no passenger lists, naturalisation certificates or other official papers documenting movement between the two countries that we can use today to answer these questions. The article is well worth reading for those with Irish ancestry especially in the UK census records now so freely available for research.
ULSTER HISTORICAL FOUNDATION 50th ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE:
The Ulster Historical Foundation turns 50 this year and a six day conference is being held in Belfast from Monday 25 September 2006 to Saturday 30 September 2006. The conference title is ÔÇ£Belfast: Past, Present and FutureÔÇØ. Ulster Historical Foundation has been assisting the local and family historian for 50 years. Their list of books published over this period would make a substantial research library with titles covering both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
Details can be found on the UHF website: http://www.ancestryireland.co.uk/conference.php or on www.ancestryireland.com where the brochure can be downloaded with a mouse click.
Articles, suggestions and information for this newsletter are welcome and may be E-mailed to: tea04055@bigpond.net.au or posted to Terry Eakin, 334 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove NSW AUSTRALIA 2066

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