ISSN 1443-5888 Volume 9, No. 12, December 2007

A Monthly Newsletter: Editor: Terry Eakin, 334 Burns Bay Road, LANE COVE, NSW 2066 Contact E-mail address: tea04055@bigpond.net.au
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ISSN 1443-5888 Volume 9, No. 12, December 2007

Post by irishgen » 10 Dec 2008, 00:48

ÔÇÿALL IRELAND SOURCES NEWSLETTERÔÇÖ

Editor: Terry Eakin, 334 Burns Bay Road, LANE COVE, NSW 2066
Contact E-mail address: tea04055@bigpond.net.auISSN 1443-5888
Volume 9, No. 12, December 2007

Introduction: ÔÇÿAll Ireland SourcesÔÇÖ is a monthly newsletter distributed free by E-mail to Family History Societies and interested researchers near the end of each month. Distribution by Australia Post each three months (three issues) costs $6.00 annually within Australia. The aim is to bring items of interest regarding Irish record sources to the Australian genealogist.
The editor would appreciate being made aware of records relating to the Irish, particularly those held in Australia or new in the LDS Family History Library. Back copies available free for downloading from http://www.sag.org.au
Note new email address.

CENSUS OF IRELAND 1911 COUNTY DUBLIN AND DUBLIN CITY 1911 NOW Online

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/ The home page comes up. It

has various questions which are links to the answers. Read these before you proceed (or if familiar with the Irish census Forms) continue with Search the Census Records for Dublin 1911
Also on the home page is the Question ÔÇ£What was Dublin like in 1911?ÔÇØ There are links below this question to see illustrated account of the City in 1911, read about Transport, Royal Visit 1911, pupils in Padraig PearceÔÇÖs school, St. EndaÔÇÖs, see Oliver St. John GogartyÔÇÖs census return and read about trade unions and see James ConnollyÔÇÖs return. These are only options. As only one county (Dublin) is online at present, searches do not need the county until County Kerry comes on line in about two weeks. The order of counties coming on line is listed under ÔÇ£Future plansÔÇØ on the home page.
Click on Search the Census Records for Dublin 1911.
The dialog box has Surname, Forename, Census year, County, Townland/Street, DED, Age + or ÔÇô 5 years in 1911, Sex Both, M or F only.
Enter surname Eakin and click search
The list gives 11 persons with the surname EAKIN
Select page with 50 and the 11 can be printed on a single page.
Double click the surname Eakin This gives the page ÔÇ£Residents of a house 7 in Millmount
Place (Drumcondra, Dublin)ÔÇØ [DED]
With the option below to VIEW CENSUS IMAGES

┬À Household Return (Form A), page 1
┬À Page 2
┬À EnumeratorÔÇÖs abstract (Form N), page 1
┬À Page 2
┬À House and Building Return (Form B1), page 1
┬À Page 2
┬À Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings Return (Form B2), page 1
┬À Page 2
Each of these is a link to the digitized image page (print if wanted)
SEARCH AGAIN link is there to call up another search.


http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/

BROWSE:
One alternative method of problem solving is to BROWSE the census.
The browse function allows you to search for someone through location, and to view households surrounding that of your ancestor. It also allows for studies of particular areas.
Going from BROWSE into Dublin (later the county will have to be selected), then into the list of DEDs, you can click on one, e.g. CLONTARF EAST (Dublin), and a list of the streets/townlands in that DED will appear. If you see one that looks familiar, clicking on that will give you a link to the occupants of that street or townland, and you can browse through these until you find the person you seek. Then you can click on occupants of the house, and further click on the original census form images.
Browsing the street/townland will give you access to the neighbours of your ancestor. The
browsing facility is also very useful for anyone trying to get a picture of a particular area in 1911, such as the main street of a small town.

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ÔÇÿALL IRELAND SOURCES NEWSLETTERÔÇÖ

BROWSE BACKWARDS THROUGH BREADCRUMBS:

The Residents of a Household page, which you get from a person search, will have, above
the list of occupants, what are known as ÔÇ£breadcrumbsÔÇØ e.g. Home / All counties / Dublin / Clontarf East / Brian Boru Avenue / Residents of a house.

By clicking on the street (Brian Boru Avenue) or DED (Clontarf East) you can get back to a
list of surnames on the street, or streets/townlands in the DED, and look at neighbours on the street/townland, or occupants of nearby streets/townlands.

Note: I did find Agus (F) to be Agnes and she signed the Form A as Agnes too on the
digitised Form A. I did find Barrister (M, Head) to be Bannister (M, Head) but as you have
immediate and free access to the original digitized forms, this is really no problem. These can be notified as errors (see below).

Transcription Errors:
There is a box for notifying errors in transcription but if your ancestor entered AIKEN and
you know it is EAKIN, this cannot be notified as an error or changed as the original input will apply in all cases. Enjoy this new database, IÔÇÖve already found female married cousinsÔÇÖ surnames. The number of children still living and number born alive and years married is a real bonus in the 1911 census of Ireland. At present (31 December 2007) only Dublin City and Dublin County have been uploaded to the website.

Future Plans: The records for 1911 are being digitised first, then those for 1901. County
Kerry will be next uploaded (in January 2008), followed by Belfast City with Counties Antrim
(Shankill parish) and County Down (Knockbreda parish). These should all come online in a few
weeks. Then in the following order (left to right across the page) the counties will follow:

Donegal Cork Wexford
Galway KingÔÇÖs County (Offaly) Limerick
Mayo Waterford Armagh
Carlow Cavan Clare
Fermanagh Kildare Kilkenny
Leitrim Londonderry (Derry) Longford
Louth Meath Monaghan
QueenÔÇÖs County (Laois) Roscommon Sligo
Tipperary Tyrone Westmeath
Wicklow

Partners in the Census online project. Library and Archives Canada has already mounted
an online exhibition of documents in their custody relating to the Irish in Canada, accompanied by text from scholars in the field. The Shamrock and the Maple Leaf can be found at http://www.collectionscanada.ca/ireland/. Cut and paste URL and look at this website.

The Director of the National Library of Ireland has given us permission to use some of the
Lawrence photographs from the turn of the last century, and photographs from other collections in its custody. The Lawrence Collection is one of Ireland's most important collection of photographs, covering the whole country, including every city and town.

Dublin City Library and Archives have allowed us to use a selection from their valuable collections of photographs.

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland is hoping to digitize its very useful Guide to Northern Ireland Sources for the Study of Canadian History, c. 1705-1992.

The Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland has given us permission to use some of their ÔÇ£Darkest DublinÔÇØ photographic collection, which records working class housing conditions in Dublin in 1912.

The Irish Railway Records Society has allowed us to use some of its unique transport material from the period.

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ÔÇÿALL IRELAND SOURCES NEWSLETTERÔÇÖ

Fingal County Council Archives have offered us a selection of very interesting local authority material for the period.

Images

The images of the original census forms on this site are in PDF format. To view a PDF file, you will need a PDF file reader, the most popular being Adobe Acrobat reader (a free tool easily available). The Adobe Acrobat reader provides image manipulation functions (print, zoom, scroll, save) which runs on the clients machine. Adobe Acrobat reader provides extensive printing options allowing a user to scale the A3 image and print selected parts of the image.

To use the PDF functionality, users must have Adobe Acrobat reader version 5 or above installed. The image should download quickly. Using the + or ÔÇö tools on the toolbar at the top of the page, you can zoom in and out of the images. The images can be printed out on most printers. For best results, A3 size

Searching tips: You can search this site in two ways: by name of individual, or by location.
Remember, the less information you put in, the more numerous the results.

Person search: It is important to remember that the names on this site have been
transcribed as they were written into the census forms. We have not corrected spellings. Some names are illegible, or appear on a damaged form. You may, therefore, have to try a number of strategies to find the person you seek.

Enter forename and surname of the individual you seek in the relevant boxes. Since this site only deals with Dublin city and county in 1911, there is no need to enter county. If you know the townland or street where the person lived, enter that in the relevant box. If you know the person's age, enter that, and the search will cover that age plus or minus 5 years. You should also enter the person's sex.

Surnames: It is important to remember that the names on this site have been transcribed as they were written into the census forms. We have not corrected spellings. Some names are illegible, or appear on a damaged form. You may, therefore, have to try a number of strategies to find the person you seek.

If you are unsure of the spelling of the person's name, you can use wildcard characters. Use an asterisk (*) to represent letters of which you are not sure, eg M*Gee will bring up McGee, MacGee and Magee. Names that begin with O as a prefix, like O'Brien, can be transcribed as O'Brien, O Brien or Obrien. Try all the variations. Sometimes people entered their entire name in either the surname or first name column. If you are unsuccessful in your first search, try entering the person's surname in the first name box, and you may be lucky.

Irish surnames: Some people entered their name in the census in Irish, and in the old Gaelic script.
These names have been listed in modern script, but not translated into English. Usually, the name of the head of household is written on the back of the form in English (see return for the household of Sean O'Casey), and this name is also indexed and included in the list of residents of a household. A list of Irish names and occupations, with translations, will appear on this site in the coming months.

Forenames: It is important to remember that the names on this site have been transcribed
as they were written into the census forms. We have not corrected spellings. Some names are illegible, or appear on a damaged form. You may, therefore, have to try a number of strategies to find the person you seek.

Sometimes forenames were shortened or petnames used, eg Margaret/Maggie, Ann/Annie, John/Jno, Michael/Mick. Wildcards can be used in these cases. Use an asterisk (*) to represent letters of which you are not sure. For example, Cat*rine will bring up Catherine, Catharine and Cathrine.

Sometimes people entered their entire name in either the surname or forename column. If you are unsuccessful in your first search, try entering the person's surname in the forename box, and you may be lucky.

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ÔÇÿALL IRELAND SOURCES NEWSLETTERÔÇÖ

Irish forenames: Some people entered their name in the census in Irish, and in the old Gaelic
script. These names have been listed in modern script, but not translated into English. Usually, the name of the head of household is written on the back of the form in English (see return for the household of Sean O'Casey), and this name is also indexed and included in the list of residents of a household. A list of Irish names and occupations, with translations, will appear on this site in the coming months.

Institutions: People in institutions like prisons, army and police barracks, asylums
and workhouses were often listed in the census only by their initials. Thus, Mary Smith will be listed only as M.S. If you think the person you seek was in an institution in 1911, first try the return for the institution, if you know it, as the ancillary information on the return (age, county of birth, previous occupation etc.) will help you to decide whether this is the right person. If you don't know the institution, or merely suspect that someone might have been in one, use their initials plus the age and sex boxes to narrow it down, e.g. M S, 25, female.

Age: The Age facility allows a search of plus or minus 5 years. If you enter an
age of 20, the search results will produce all of the names between the ages of 15 and 25.

Location search: The basic topographical divisions for the census are: County; District
Electoral Division; Townland or Street. This is a simple hierarchical structure which makes it easy to access any area in the country. The returns are arranged in clusters by townland/street within District Electoral Division within county.

As this site, as yet, only deals with Dublin city and county, there is no need to specify county. The basic topographical units used on the site are townlands, the smallest land denomination in Ireland, for rural areas, and streets for urban areas. If you know the townland or street where the person lived, enter that in the relevant box. Click on "Search" and all of the people who lived in that townland/ street will appear, with their age and sex. You can sort them alphabetically by surname, first name, townland/street name, DED, age and sex.

When searching for a street, parade, avenue, terrace, square, gardens etc., only put in the name of the street, without suffix, e.g. Glengariff for Glengariff Parade, Mountjoy for Mountjoy Square, Park for Park Avenue.

If you are not sure what townland or street the person you are seeking came from, you can browse within District Electoral Divisions (DEDs), topographical units containing a number of townlands/streets which were used by the census authorities to divide each county.

If you are looking for Main St., in any town, type in Main St. in the Townland Street box, and the name of the town in the DED box, e.g. Main St., Swords or Main St., Blackrock. This will bring you to a list of households on that street.

County Roscommon: The Resource County Roscommon 2007 CD continues to get
good reviews. An expert genealogist has referred to it as "the best ever collection of
single county information and resources available". The CD is to be listed in the
January 2008 edition of the prestigious "New England Ancestors Magazine" which
has a distribution of 20,000 copies.

Fr. Francis Beirne, a Co. Roscommon Parish Priest, author and very keen local historian,
arranged for the official launch of the CD during Irish Heritage week in August 2007. It was
launched by the Mayor in front of an invited group of 50-60 people, including members of
parliament and leaders of the Roscommon Historical Society and the Roscommon Heritage
Group. John and Mrs Hunter attended this launch.

Eneclann, a business unit of Trinity College, Dublin, is most interested in adding the CD to their website http://www.eneclann.ie/

The Resource County Roscommon 2007 CD is available from Gould Genealogy
http://www.gould.com.au

(or from the compiler John Hunter ohaylock@bigpond.net.au ÔÇô payment by PayPal)

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ÔÇÿALL IRELAND SOURCES NEWSLETTERÔÇÖ

Articles, suggestions and information for this newsletter are welcome and may be E-mailed to: tea04055@bigpond.net.au or posted to Terry Eakin, 334 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove NSW AUSTRALIA 2066

Page 49

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